The new age of C-Suite titles and roles.

Things are changing all the way into the titles within the C-Suite in corporate America.  Are you up on the latest roles and titles? Here is a quick snap shot of some you may or may not of heard of.

Chief Ecosystem Officer

Of course the three-letter acronym is already taken, but putting one person in charge of industry dynamics and partnerships will soon be a mainstay of the corporate structure

Chief User Experience Officer

User experience used to be an afterthought for hardware and software designers. Now that bulky instruction manuals are largely (and thankfully) a thing of the past, technology companies need to ensure that their products are intuitive from the moment they’re activated.

Chief Automation Officer

As jobs continue to get automated out of existence, Frey believes a member of the core leadership team of the future will be put in charge of identifying opportunities for companies to become more competitive through automation.

Chief Freelance Relationship Officer

Fifty-three million Americans, or 34% of the U.S. workforce, are considered contingent, temporary, diversified, or freelance employees today, with that number expected to reach 40% by the year 2020.

Chief Intellectual Property Officer

The world of intellectual property law is only getting more vast and complicated as new innovations hit the market. Not only will companies in the near future need a core leadership team member who can wade through the dizzying sea of intellectual property laws and patents to ensure their own compliance, but also remain vigilant to protect their own company against infringement.

Chief Data Officer

Chief data officers will help CEOs and COOs run more profitable and streamlined companies by wading through the sea of information now available to them in order to draw valuable insights.

Chief Privacy Officer

As companies hang on to more data, the onus to keep that data safe is growing, with the PR nightmare that ensues following a breach becoming more than most can handle.

Chief Compliance Officer

One of the few barriers that remain for businesses of all sizes that want to operate beyond their national borders is the issue of compliance. Organizations have gone so far as to designate a chief compliance officer to ensure that all rules of international trade are being met, and many feel that the importance of this role will expand moving forward.

Chief Human Resources Officer

Already an established position within many major organizations today, Audra believes the role of chief human resources officer is evolving from one of compliance to core leadership as competition for talent intensifies.

Chief Administrative Officer

As CEOs delegate tasks to their expanding teams of C-suite executives, they will be required to handle more complex, high-level decisions. As such, chief administrative officers will help relieve CEOs and COOs of some of their day-to-day tasks, allowing them to put their time and effort towards critical, big-picture decisions.

Welcome to the new Digital Age of the C-Suite Evolution!

 

 

 

Why hire a COO?

While the actual duties of a COO can vary greatly company to company, the classic description includes responsibility for managing the activities of the company, including daily operations. As one of the highest-ranking executives, the COO ( Chief Operating Officer) reports to the CEO and the company’s board of directors.

Hiring a COO can free up a CEO to focus on major external initiatives and foster new opportunities rather than being occupied with keeping multiple departments productive. Also, an experienced COO can bring new leadership tools to an office – which is especially true for start-ups whose CEO has been the single executive running the show from day one.

“In the CEO-COO model, the CEO is trying to figure out the strategic aspects and the COO owns the execution model. The COO figures out how to keep things running efficiently, and on time,”

How much should you pay?

In order to attract top candidates, you’ll need to offer a competitive salary. Searching competitors’ job listings can be a useful means of finding that industry information if you aren’t in the position to purchase salary study information or work with a firm that conducts compensation research. Other simple sources of information can be PayScale.com and Salary.com – and they adjust for geographical inequalities in pay.

How do you get the most out of your COO?

To get the most out of your COO, communication is the key. If you are the CEO, you need to communicate and forecast your vision to them clearly. Once this is done, ask them to repeat it back, then give them a deadline to create an attach plan to execute your vision. Use simple tools to measure milestones and progress, I highly recommend Basecamp, a tool that is easy and powerful with little to no learning curve.

Has your COO lost their “Groove” ?

At times the CEO, COO, and the staff can fall into a rut. This rut does not mean you need to replace them rather than start over , let’s try to get our groove back! I can help, I specialize in Re-Syncing and re aligning your internal team. Sometimes a fresh set of eyes, and ears is all you need, other times you may simply need a new COO, but until I lock myself in the room with you and your staff I can not determine what is best for your unique situation.

Change is hard, but necessary for growth, and during growth a harmonious team is critical. If any of the above resonates with you let’s chat.

 

 

 

 

 

Character Traits of the a Chief Operating Officer

Before you can define the best character traits and skills that make up a good Chief Operating Officer, it’s first necessary to define the job description. Because there is so much variation in job duties from one organization to another, there is also a large variation in the characteristics that make up the “perfect COO”. However, there are some key traits that are necessary for most COO positions, no matter what responsibilities ultimately end up on the job description.

Interpersonal Skills: Very often the COO is responsible for supervising and leading staff. He or she may also work directly with upper management and executives as a peer. An effective COO is able to function smoothly with both diverse groups. This requires a high level of emotional intelligence and the ability to easily read people.

Intelligence: A COO needs to be able to think clearly and quickly in a variety of situations. The COO will likely be leading the creation and implementation of new systems and procedures to enable an organization to operate more effectively. This takes a great deal of analytical thinking and creativity.

Teamwork: A good COO must be a team player, someone who can work in collaboration with a wide range of personality types. Leading change is often part of the COO job responsibilities. This requires the ability to see the overall big picture and the ability to pull the team together to work through change efficiently and effectively.

Trust: All the team-building in the world will not be effective if there is a lack of trust between a COO and staff. The COO must work to earn the trust of his or her employees and peers. Trust can be established through honesty, open communication, fairness, predictability, and the ability to admit mistakes and to correct them.

These common traits are necessary for any COO to ultimately be successful and effective, no matter what types of projects are initiated.

If you feel you have these qualities and are not currently a COO then lets talk? If you currently have a COO, and feel they need help in these areas, lets talk.

You Represent the Film Community

The states of technology, film, and politics are constantly developing and changing. This produces new challenges for filmmakers. Before 9/11 recording equipment prohibitions were more lax, and before that there were drones no one was forced to think about remote controlled aerials being regulated. So you can imagine the confusion that now exists concerning the legality of filming rights for non-filmmakers and filmmakers. Media activism has its place, it’s just not on a film set, and this is especially true when badges are involved. It’s ok to be passionate about the First Amendment, or the conceptions mentioned above about filming and locations. Even if you’ve been asked to leave, you can take a safe stance within the proper channels. Arguing with others, especially security guards, does not benefit you or the film community. It also makes clearing a set even more difficult. Of course no one can make you delete footage you’ve already captured, but that is a confrontation that is best and easily avoided. The goal is to make a lasting film, video, commercial, or contribution, not enemies.

This is my last post on our Summer filming kick off series. I hope that it has been of value to you. Video is one of the most effective marketing tools, but be smart & considerate. Video will serve you and your clients well for generations to come.

Happy filming, and don’t forget we have a full media department who can shoot all your video needs as well as take your photographs.

– Audra Hajj

 

 

Find the Legal Forms You Need

There are ways to find the legal forms you need, even if you’re on a budget. You may not have the money for an attorney either, or the funding for college to become one yourself. If you have a smartphone you are smart indeed because there is an app called Shake that is for both Android and iOS platforms, which gives you mobile release forms right at your fingertips. Shake is versatile and popular since it is so easy to use and free. It gives you the chance to use over a dozen location releases, talent releases, video forms created by licensed attorneys, contracts and parental consent forms that cover everyone from costume designers to extras. Let’s get one thing straight, nothing can actually take the place of an attorney, but Shake gives them a run for their money.

When you have the time and resources you can also use another great legal form site called LegalZoom. They provide downloadable location and talent release forms that come with an A+ Better Business Bureau rating and a 100% satisfaction guarantee. Simply download their instructions, detailed releases, and explanation of legal terms so you can be sure to use their forms responsibly. The investment in LegalZoom is inexpensive $14.95, a one-time investment. Just remember you get what you pay for, so film smart with the correct legal forms.

STATE FILM OFFICES & ORGANIZATIONS

Alabama Film Office

Alaska Film Office

Arizona Production Association

Arkansas Production Alliance

California Film Commission

Colorado Office of Film

Television & Media

Connecticut Office of Film

Television & Digital Media

Delaware Film Office

D.C. Office of Motion Picture

& Television Development

Florida Office of Film & Entertainment

Georgia Film & TV Production

Hawaii Film Office

Idaho Film Office

Illinois Film Office

Indiana Film Office

Iowa State Office of Media Production

Kansas Film Commission

Kentucky Film Office

Louisiana Entertainment

Maine Film Office

Maryland Film Office

Massachusetts Film Office

Michigan Film Office

Minnesota Film & TV

Mississippi Film Office

Missouri Film Office

Montana Film Office

Nebraska Film Office

Nevada Film Office

New Hampshire Film

& Television Office

New Jersey Motion Picture

& Television Commission

New Mexico Film Office

New York Loves Film

North Carolina Film Office

North Dakota Film Production

Ohio Film Office

Oklahoma Film & Music Office

Oregon Governor’s Office of Film

& Television

Pennsylvania Film Office

Rhode Island Film & TV Office

South Carolina Film Commission

South Dakota Film Office

Tennessee Film, Entertainment

& Music Commission

Texas Film Commission

Utah Film Commission

Vermont Film & New Media

Virginia Film Office

Washington Filmworks

West Virginia Film Office

Wisconsin Film Organization

Wyoming Film Office

Make Sure You Obtain the Appropriate Permits

Permits, approval, and permission are all important when it comes to filming, and every location is different. However, you can protect yourself by researching permits ahead of time. If there are any local film offices you can start by checking with them prior to filming. For example, you may not need a permit as long as you shoot in a particular manner such as on a tri-pod or with a hand-held camera. These types of restrictions are different everywhere. If you are going to film something like a car chase via a crane, chances are you will need some form of permit. You will find that some areas are more lenient that others too.

When you connect with a local film office, all of this will be made transparent so you can decide how you want to shoot within regulations. A film office can also provide you with other benefits since they exist to support filmmakers. They are one of the best resources for information concerning filming locations, casting calls, and potential tax incentives. If you are filming in larger counties, cities, national or state parks they may have their own regulations in addition to any state-wide terms. You can check with the state organization if that’s the case. Overall you should always ask if local permits are needed, then follow-up by asking what else you can do to get along with them.

STATE FILM OFFICES & ORGANIZATIONS

Alabama Film Office

Alaska Film Office

Arizona Production Association

Arkansas Production Alliance

California Film Commission

Colorado Office of Film

Television & Media

Connecticut Office of Film

Television & Digital Media

Delaware Film Office

D.C. Office of Motion Picture

& Television Development

Florida Office of Film & Entertainment

Georgia Film & TV Production

Hawaii Film Office

Idaho Film Office

Illinois Film Office

Indiana Film Office

Iowa State Office of Media Production

Kansas Film Commission

Kentucky Film Office

Louisiana Entertainment

Maine Film Office

Maryland Film Office

Massachusetts Film Office

Michigan Film Office

Minnesota Film & TV

Mississippi Film Office

Missouri Film Office

Montana Film Office

Nebraska Film Office

Nevada Film Office

New Hampshire Film

& Television Office

New Jersey Motion Picture

& Television Commission

New Mexico Film Office

New York Loves Film

North Carolina Film Office

North Dakota Film Production

Ohio Film Office

Oklahoma Film & Music Office

Oregon Governor’s Office of Film

& Television

Pennsylvania Film Office

Rhode Island Film & TV Office

South Carolina Film Commission

South Dakota Film Office

Tennessee Film, Entertainment

& Music Commission

Texas Film Commission

Utah Film Commission

Vermont Film & New Media

Virginia Film Office

Washington Filmworks

West Virginia Film Office

Wisconsin Film Organization

Wyoming Film Office

Understand the Difference between Plagiarism and Parody

Plot elements can be common. There are quite a few movies, and even commercials, throughout history that have the same type of storyline. This happens mainly because it’s human nature. Even if a plot line is close to another it is not consider to be a copyright violation. The idea behind why it’s not an infringement has to do with intent. Just because two movies or films are similar doesn’t mean they are in the same genre, or that they’re imitating one another on purpose. The overall idea is that each film has its own unique message and it’s a clear parody. This is how a lot of songs, jingles and movies are produced in two different genres such as drama and comedy. They do not directly take information and re-use it; they create new content based on a parody of it. Knowing all of this, it is still a good idea to ask an artist or film maker for their permission out of respect. It’s still different from stealing or plagiarising, even if it is more complex.

Copyright, How Much Does It Protect You?

What Is the Concept of Copyright?

The definition of copyright is the protective right that a creator holds for a body of work that they produce. This can include video clips, a specific plot element, or an audio track. If you want to use someone else’s work, you have to obtain permission otherwise you will be liable for damages. Copyright starts to exist the moment something is created, which means you do not need to register your work in order to establish ownership of it. When you take the steps to register it, it just proves you are the owner and makes litigation easier since it’s then archived as public record. You can have artwork officially registered with the United State Copyright Office for $35. You can also register it through an attorney. For other organizations and screenwriters, the Writer’s Guild of America offers their registration services that are archived and renewable for five year periods. The overall idea is to respect the property of other people, then choose how to protect your property.

Copyright Protection Does Have Limitations

Although it may seem that having copyright protection will protect you fully, there are some limitations. For instance, it does not safeguard you against broad genres. There is nothing preventing someone else or even you from coming up with the next film about a love triangle, for example. It can be about the subject matter, but it cannot directly follow the specific plot line or monologue of an older movie about the same subject. If you take the exact same idea, you are asking for a lot of trouble. It’s always best to be original; it will keep you out of court and save you a lot of unnecessary expenses in the long run.

Is Your Subject Off Limits?

You need to understand when you’re filming in sensitive and insensitive locations. Whether you realized it or not, if you’re filming from private property across the road, and filming someone incidentally, there are certain subjects that are off-limits specifically for security reasons. These areas include government buildings, some aspects of mass transportation like train stations, airports, and tunnels, and military installations. You should always search for signs that make it clear that the area prohibits recording devices or photography. Try to reach out to their media relations department before you arrive if you are unsure of whether your subject is off limits.

Does this apply to public figures? Not entirely. High-profile people such as politicians and celebrities endure less protection against being caught on film. This is because when a public figure is voluntarily in the public eye, to some extend they waive their privacy. That’s why the paparazzi’s footage of stars doing mundane things in life is an actual act that does not require a release form. This doesn’t mean that people do not have the right to control how you use their likeness. They can. You do not have the right to use the documentation with a commercial slant.

Film Responsibly: Know Your Filming Rights

When you are going to provide videos and films as a business it is important that you are protected and that you know your film rights. You may be wondering why you should even worry about film rights. Would you drive a car without the right driving license or driving permit? The answer is more than likely no, and even if you did you could be liable and penalized under the law if you got caught or had an accident. The same goes for film rights. You need to know more about privacy, permits, parody, and permission.

 

What Are Your Filming Goals?

Whether you intend to grow at target audience or go viral on YouTube, you need to figure out your filming goals and learn a few strategies. Besides, it’s very difficult to run your business from jail and having any type of criminal activity on your record doesn’t exactly promote your business well. You also don’t want to end up giving your money to legal opponents or lawyers. Instead you need to follow key principles for avoiding disasters on location and in court. It is more important to focus on what needs to be done, mastering the art of filming, not liabilities and rights.

Private Property: Are You Allowed to Film There?

When you start filming you need to understand the most basic rules first. Are you trying to film on private property that you’re standing on? If so you must get the owner’s permission so you can film there. You also need to keep in mind that places people call ‘public’ may still be private property. Of course property has more than one meaning too. Intellectual property like music and logos are protected against recording, as well. There is also the idea that you’re capturing private property on film. Oh no! How are you going to be able to film anything if you can’t film private property? The keyword in this situation is ‘standing’. You must have permission to record when you’re actually standing on private property. That doesn’t mean you can’t record aspects of it that are observable by the public if they’re captured from a distance and incidentally, making them part of your background and not your subject. The key concept is to always get permission. No peeking over fences or you could be fined.

Public Locations: Point, Zoom, and Film Right?

Filming in public is allowed. Let’s look at it from a kindergarten level. What you see in front of you is what you can film. However, and this is where the kindergarten concepts come into play, you have to stay where you belong and respect the privacy of other people. You know, keep your hands to yourself and only go where you belong. In today’s society privacy is a very important issue. Long gone are the days you can do something you don’t want to be caught doing and get away with it. Now there’s a smartphone with a camera to catch it all! People tend to expect to be viewed when they go out in public. The same goes for their property. However, it’s taking it too far when you put them on exhibit or showcase them. To keep yourself protected in case someone’s face is going to be in your film, you need to obtain a readable release form. Also keep in mind they may have things on their person they want kept private such as an unzipped bag, or they may want to keep their whereabouts private. The overall idea when filming in public is to stay out of people’s faces and try not to be creepy.